Another plus for EVs: Plug in America finds that EVs depreciate significantly less than gas powered vehicles

How much money do you lose to depreciation when you’re driving electric? Not as much as when you’re driving on gas.

Estimated Costs Battery AmortizationA recent study from Plug in America calculated that for a Nissan LEAF, you’re looking at 5 to 8 cents per mile driven. That’s compared to 23.7cents per mile for a similarly expensive car (that data they got from Edmunds.com).

While those are the most relevant numbers for drivers, the study was actually looking at something quite different.

Plug in America actually wanted to see how much of a burden it is on the car to make an EV part of the electric grid via a Vehicle to Grid (V2G) system.

We’ve covered it before--the grid of the future will likely rely on EVs to act as generators and take some pressure off the grid as a whole.

Plug In America wanted to “start the conversation” about how you would actually get drivers to connect their cars to the grid. They rightly figured people would want to be compensated for the wear and tear the grid will put on their car. They’d have to replace the battery pack sooner and that’s an inconvenience, afterall.

Their numbers for the LEAF and the Tesla Model S suggest a battery amortization cost between $0.19 and $0.40 per kWh when connected to the grid, which is quite a bit more than the 5 to 11.5 cents from driving. It’ll be interesting to see how utilities go about incentivizing this move for EV drivers- what would it take for you to go for it?